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St. Elizabeth Hospital receives first doses of COVID-19 vaccine – WLWT Cincinnati

St. Elizabeth Hospital received its first shipment of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine on Tuesday.It was originally scheduled to be delivered on Monday but was delayed. The hospital was one of 11 across Kentucky that received the vaccine on Tuesday. UofL Hospital, Baptist Health Lexington and the Medical Center at Bowling Green received shipments on Monday. Gov. Andy Beshear said more is on the way, asking people to be patient. The team that will do the vaccinations used the extra day to prepare for a process more intense than most vaccinations.“We refer to the vaccine team clinic as the ‘Seal Team,’ vaccine team,” said Angela Brunemann, the director of ambulatory outpatient pharmacy at St. Elizabeth.The process is more intense than most vaccinations. Front-line workers enter the room and will go to multiple stations. At the first station, they can ask questions and they’ll get a reminder card to tell them when and where to get the second dose of the two-step process. From there, they get the vaccine and then on to an area where they can be observed for any issues.The entire process will take someone about 10 minutes to finish.“We’ve standardized every process that we can so that way when we get the vaccine, we can hit the gas and go forward and all of the other pieces are already in place,” Brunemann said.

St. Elizabeth Hospital received its first shipment of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine on Tuesday.

It was originally scheduled to be delivered on Monday but was delayed.

The hospital was one of 11 across Kentucky that received the vaccine on Tuesday. UofL Hospital, Baptist Health Lexington and the Medical Center at Bowling Green received shipments on Monday.

Gov. Andy Beshear said more is on the way, asking people to be patient.

The team that will do the vaccinations used the extra day to prepare for a process more intense than most vaccinations.

“We refer to the vaccine team clinic as the ‘Seal Team,’ vaccine team,” said Angela Brunemann, the director of ambulatory outpatient pharmacy at St. Elizabeth.

The process is more intense than most vaccinations. Front-line workers enter the room and will go to multiple stations. At the first station, they can ask questions and they’ll get a reminder card to tell them when and where to get the second dose of the two-step process. From there, they get the vaccine and then on to an area where they can be observed for any issues.

The entire process will take someone about 10 minutes to finish.

“We’ve standardized every process that we can so that way when we get the vaccine, we can hit the gas and go forward and all of the other pieces are already in place,” Brunemann said.

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