Friday, March 5
Shadow

COVID-19 LIVE UPDATES: Kansas working through details of who gets vaccinated when – KMBC Kansas City

Kansas City metro area health officials are grappling with how to handle continuing case count increases after reopening businesses more than four months ago. What you need to know:The Kansas Department of Health and Environment said Monday the state has 209,689 confirmed cases of COVID-19, and there have been 2,507 deaths since the outbreak started. Kansas is now only updating COVID-19 data on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services said Thursday there have been 376,811 cases of COVID-19 since the start of the outbreak and 5,294 deaths.FRIDAY7 a.m. — Two eastern Missouri restaurants have filed a lawsuit challenging an emergency order that closes bars and restaurants at 11 p.m. to stop the spread of the coronavirus. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Tony’s on Main in St. Charles and Shamrock’s Pub and Grill in St. Peters argued in court Wednesday that officials failed to act for months to stop the virus before issuing the “bizarre and non-sensical” emergency order on Nov. 24. The suit names St. Charles, St. Charles County and others. St. Charles County Circuit Judge Ted House rejected the restaurants’ request for a temporary restraining order, saying they did not show enough evidence of “irreparable harm.” But he said they have a compelling case to recoup damages.Dining restrictions started months ago across the region, with St. Louis city bars and restaurants subjected to a similar curfew. St. Louis County banned indoor service in mid-November but is considering whether to allow it to resume, with restrictions, in January.St. Charles County Executive Steve Ehlmann said the bar curfew is intended to keep people “from flocking to St. Charles County after they are barred from other areas.”But the suit argues that other St. Charles County businesses, such as diners, restaurants without liquor licenses and the Ameristar Casino, aren’t subjected to the curfew, and that there is no scientific basis for the order.“We just want a level playing field,” said the restaurants’ attorney, Daniel Goldberg.Statewide, 17,470 new confirmed coronavirus cases have been reported in the past week, according to state health department data. That’s an average of about 2,496 new cases a day. Dr. Alex Garza, who leads the St. Louis Metropolitan Pandemic Task Force, said Wednesday that the numbers of coronavirus patients in the St. Louis region are dangerously high, and by all measures hospitals are facing an “extremely risky situation.”The task force reported 871 COVID-19 patients in area hospitals, 182 in intensive care units, and 114 on ventilators. The hospitals also reported 31 patient deaths due to the virus, the highest number since the task force began tracking it in early October.“The amount of virus spreading in our community is still putting us all at risk,” Garza said. “We are still at the height of the pandemic.”6 a.m. — Kansas is working through the details of exactly who will be eligible for coronavirus vaccines in exactly what order as it concentrates on giving shots mostly to health care workers this month.Democratic Gov. Laura Kelly told leaders of the Republican-controlled Legislature this week that the vaccines have gone mostly to health care workers, though that group also includes employees in state prisons. She said vaccines could go “almost exclusively” to health care workers into mid-January but also suggested some doses already have reached nursing homes.Kelly told The Topeka Capital-Journal in an interview that prison inmates are to get vaccinated before the general public because they’re in “congregate” housing, but the state doesn’t expect vaccines to be available for some adults for at least several months.The state’s vaccine plan made health care workers and nursing home workers and residents the the first in line, followed by other “essential” workers and people 75 or older, particularly those at high risk of coronavirus complications. But Kelly said in an Associated Press interview that the state is considering vaccinations for some officials to preserve “continuity of operations.”“We expect that sometime right after the first of the year, we will have a more definitive list of who will be vaccinated when,” Kelly told legislative leaders during a meeting Wednesday.Kansas has reported nearly 210,000 confirmed and probable coronavirus cases since the pandemic began in early March through Wednesday, or one for every 14 of its 2.9 million residents. It has reported more than 2,500 deaths, or one for every 1,162 residents. Kelly’s staff has repeatedly said that she will get vaccinated — in public — when it’s “her turn.” However her husband, a retired pulmonologist and sleep disorder specialist, is working part-time in a clinic screening patients for COVID-19 and other diseases before surgeries and was vaccinated Tuesday.And the governor said the state is looking at how quickly some key officials in state agencies, the courts and the Legislature should get vaccinated.“We’re looking at that right now, determining who ought to be vaccinated soon,” Kelly told The Associated Press. “We’ll make that decision pretty quickly.”The state prison system — housing about 8,600 inmates — has reported nearly 5,200 cases among offenders and another 944 cases among staff. Four workers and a dozen inmates have died.The latest staff death was reported Wednesday by the El Dorado Correctional Facility. The prison about 30 miles (48 kilometers) northeast of Wichita described Gabe Morales as a “wonderful asset.”Morales began his career in the state prison system at the Winfield Correctional Facility in May 2014 and moved to the El Dorado prison in July 2015. Part of Morales’s job was to prepare inmates for life after their sentences ended.He told KAKE-TV for a story last year that, “It’s not about the person they are when they came in, you really want to affect them, so they’re a better person when they go out.”Prison staff members who worked in units for inmates with COVID-19 began receiving vaccines last week. The state’s vaccination plan calls for giving shots to “critical” populations after essential workers and at-risk older Kansans but does not specifically spell out whether prison inmates are in that group. Kelly said inmates will get shots when the state gives them to people in “congregate” living such as state hospitals.That’s likely to spark some political backlash.“There is no reason prisoners should ever get this vaccine before law abiding Kansans,” The Kansas Republican Party tweeted.But Kelly told The Capital-Journal: “There are all sorts of other people who were not convicted of a crime who work in those facilities, and vaccinations protect them, too.”Meanwhile, the state Department of Health and Environment reported that as of Wednesday, nursing homes had seen 530 clusters of two more cases, accounting for nearly 10,500 cases and almost 1,100 COVID-19 deaths — almost 44% of all the state’s coronavirus deaths. The department listed 51 active clusters of five or more cases in nursing homes, accounting for nearly 600 cases in all.Vaccines for nursing home workers and residents are to be given on site, mostly through pharmacy giants CVS and Walgreens. Both have indicated that shots could start in Kansas next week.Kelly has been “outspoken” in making sure frail, elderly Kansans are near the top of the list for the vaccine, said Linda MowBray, president and CEO of the Kansas Health Care Association, which represents about 260 long-term care facilities. But she said had hoped the vaccines would come sooner to the homes.“When somebody says you’re tier one, priority one, right up there with everybody else, or the health care workers, it’s a little bit disheartening that it’s not really first of the first,” she said..[ COVID-19 IN KC: TRACKING CASES, DEATHS AND LATEST RESTRICTIONS ][ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS & ANSWERS ABOUT THE COVID-19 VACCINE ] THURSDAY12:30 p.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services reported 3,231 new confirmed cases on Thursday, bringing the state’s total to 376,811 since the pandemic began.There have now been 5,294 deaths linked to COVID-19 in Missouri, which is up 39 from Wednesday’s reporting. There have been 76 deaths reported in the last seven days.[ MISSOURI COVID-19 DASHBOARD]Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.The state said it has tested a total of 3,535,936, and 107,180 were tested in the past seven days. There have been 17,470 positive cases and an average of 2,496 cases a day in the last week.Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 28,800 (+255) confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 22,368 (+252) cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 5,951 (+114) cases in Clay County, 5,259 (+65) in Cass County and 2,231 (+29) in Platte County.[ COVID-19 IN KC: TRACKING CASES, DEATHS AND LATEST RESTRICTIONS ][ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS & ANSWERS ABOUT THE COVID-19 VACCINE ] WEDNESDAY8:30 p.m. — If you are looking for how many people in Kansas and Missouri have received COVID-19 vaccines already, you may have trouble finding the information.As of Wednesday, both states have yet to publish online statistics showing where the state has distributed COVID-19 vaccines, how many doses each state has received, and the demographics of people receiving shots. READ MORE.1 p.m. — Missouri’s tradition-bound Senate is installing an audio monitoring system in its committee hearing rooms so employees, lobbyists and the public can listen to debate in their homes or offices as the pandemic rages. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Senate Administrator Patrick Baker said the changes could mean fewer people in a building that is often crowded during the nearly five-month annual session.“It’s all because of COVID,” Baker said.Statewide, 18,467 new confirmed cases have been reported in the past week, according to state health department data. That’s about 2,638 new cases a day on average. As the pandemic progressed, a handful of lawmakers, Gov. Mike Parson, lobbyists and numerous staff members have been infected. Still masking is not widespread. During a recent meeting of the House, opposition to face coverings even in close quarters was evident, with an estimated 70 of the 163-member chamber going maskless.Bringing Senate hearings to the internet is notable because the chamber has largely shunned technological innovation, with laptops barred from the chamber and votes cast verbally. The House also is making changes in an attempt to give people an option of staying away from crowded corridors, with video links being installed in committee r12:30 p.m. — The Kansas Department of Health and Environment reported an increase of 5,089 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in its first update since Monday, pushing the statewide total to 209,689 since the outbreak started.KDHE officials said Wednesday the death total grew by 59 to 2,507 and hospitalizations increased by 157 to 6,424 since the outbreak started.Health officials said Wednesday that 33% (-6) of ICU beds are available and 76% (+0) of the state’s ventilators are available.The state said it has tested 962,204 people with 752,515 negative test results and an overall monthly positive test rate of 13.6%.[ KANSAS COVID-19 COVID-19 DASHBOARD ]Sedgwick County has moved back ahead of Johnson County for the highest confirmed cases since the start of the outbreak with 36,975. Johnson County is second with 36,727 cases. Wyandotte County is third with 14,857 cases. Leavenworth County has 4,823 cases, Douglas County reports 5,814 and Miami County has 1,618. Health officials said the median age of people with COVID-19 is 39, and they are monitoring 429 active outbreak clusters with 215 clusters reported in long-term care facilities.Noon — KMBC Investigates is working to find out how many people in Kansas and Missouri have received COVID-19 vaccines. Neither the Kansas Department of Health and Environment and the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services have vaccine dashboards yet.11 a.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services reported 3,141 new confirmed cases on Wednesday, bringing the state’s total to 373,580 since the pandemic began.There have now been 5,255 deaths linked to COVID-19 in Missouri, which is up 67 from Tuesday’s reporting. The MSHSS said Wednesday morning that the spike can be attributed to analysis of death certificates and those numbers were reflected in the totals.There have been 75 deaths reported in the last seven days.[ MISSOURI COVID-19 DASHBOARD]Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.The state said it has tested a total of 3,513,613, and 116,530 were tested in the past seven days. There have been 18,467 positive cases and an average of 2,638 cases a day in the last week.Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 28,545 (+145) confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 22,116 (+597) cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 5,837 (+31) cases in Clay County, 5,194 (+186) in Cass County and 2,202 (+74) in Platte County.9:30 a.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services said this week’s death certificate analysis resulted in 246 COVID-19 case records being updated to reflect patient deaths. These 246 deaths were and will be reflected in Tuesday’s and Wednesday’s dashboard updates, the MDHSS said . Below is a breakdown of when these 246 deaths occurred: Month of Death Count Apr 1 Jul 2 Aug 1 Sep 1 Oct 7 Nov 153 Dec 81 Total updates 246 8 a.m. — St. Louis-area hospitals continue to be stretched thin while battling the coronavirus pandemic, local health officials announced Tuesday. Bed capacity at hospitals in the St. Louis area is at about 82%, according to the St. Louis Metropolitan Pandemic Task Force. Intensive care units are at 90% capacity. Cases continue to rise in the St. Louis area, and at least another 16 St. Louis County police officers tested positive for the virus in the past week. According to the department, there have been at least 145 confirmed cases at the agency so far this year. Statewide, 17,778 new confirmed cases have been reported in the past week, according to state health department data. That’s about 2,540 new cases a day on average. State health officials on Tuesday urged Missourians, including healthy people, to get tested for the virus. The agency asked those without symptoms to consider getting tested to help stop the virus’ spread through asymptomatic carriers and to prevent unknowingly sickening friends and loved ones over the holidays. The University of Missouri-Columbia on Tuesday also announced most students living on campus must be tested for the virus before moving back after the winter break. Students who recently tested positive won’t need to be retested.7:30 a.m. — Gov. Laura Kelly on Tuesday named the Kansas Department of Labor’s deputy secretary as its top administrator as she works to find another, permanent leader for an agency that struggled for months to process a surge in claims from workers left unemployed by the coronavirus pandemic.Acting Secretary Brett Flachsbarth became the third person to lead the Department of Labor in less than seven months. Kelly’s first labor secretary, Delia Garcia, resign in June amid problems with the system for distributing unemployment benefits. Her replacement, Acting Secretary Ryan Wright was allowed by law to serve only six months, which ended Tuesday. The Democratic governor credited Wright with improving the Department of Labor’s operations and making “significant progress” in building a system to handle a program created by Congress to provide benefits under the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program to independent contractors and other workers who normally don’t receive benefits. But top Republican in the GOP-controlled Legislature said the department continues to struggle and he’s still getting complaints from constituents about their benefits being delayed.“I don’t know that it improves anything or weakens anything,” incoming Senate Majority leader Gene Suellentrop, a Wichita Republican, said of Flachsbarth’s appointment. Kelly said during a Statehouse news conference that she hopes to name a permanent secretary “in the next couple of weeks.” That appointment would require Kansas Senate confirmation, when an acting secretary’s appointment does not. The changes at the Department of Labor come as the state continues to see hundreds of new confirmed and probable coronavirus cases day. Kansas has reported more than 204,000 cases since the pandemic reached the state in early March, or one for every 14 of its 2.9 million residents. The state’s economy has weakened again recently, with a rise in new, initial claims for regular unemployment benefits in recent weeks. The state’s unemployment rate jumped to 5.6% in November from 5% in October, after dropping steadily from a 11.9% peak in April, when a statewide stay-at-home order issued by Kelly was in effect.The Department of Labor acknowledged that it had a backlog of 25,000 regular unemployment claims in June, but spokesman Jerry Grasso said it was fewer than 3,000 as of Monday, down from almost 3,600 the week before. Kelly put the backlog Tuesday afternoon at about 1,800 claims. For the extra Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program, Grasso said, 11,000 people with claims have submitted part or all of the documents they’d need to receive it. He said the state has another 14,000 to 15,000 “phantom” claims that either have been abandoned or are fraudulent. He said the department is handling about 500 issues related the PUA program a day.The Department of Labor has said it has received more than 150,000 fraudulent claims for PUA benefits. Suellentrop, a business owner, said his name was used for one a month ago. Kelly said the department “has largely been stabilized” under Wright. He is returning to his old job as Kelly’s deputy chief of staff. “Are there problems still? Yes. Will there be problems tomorrow? Yes,” Kelly said. “But it’s how we approach problem-solving that’s most important, and we have approached it pretty aggressively, and, I think, been able to resolve most of the problems.”Flachsbarth joined the labor department in 2005 and became deputy secretary in January 2019, when Kelly took office. The governor said he “knows the ins-and-outs of the issues” facing the agency.Kelly and Department of Labor officials have blamed problems in processing claims for benefits on the agency decades-old computer system. Grasso said officials there have discussed upgrades costing about $30 million, with the cost possibly spread out over several years.Suellentrop said: “We have to find a way to stand up another system as just absolutely as quick as possible. This is not going to go away.”The pandemic also prompted Kelly to alter her plans for giving the governor’s annual State of the State address after the Legislature convenes its 90-day annual session Jan. 11. She plans to give a virtual address, rather than doing it in person in the House chamber at the Statehouse, with lawmakers, the Kansas Supreme Court and other officials packed into the hall.7 a.m. — The state of Kansas isn’t officially listing the number of people who have recovered from COVID-19, but local health departments across the state are keeping track. According to numbers from Wednesday morning, there have been 138,352 people who have recovered from the coronavirus. This includes 23,205 in Johnson County, 9,409 in Wyandotte County, 4,117 in Leavenworth County, 4,385 in Douglas County and 1,049 in Miami County.[ COVID-19 IN KC: TRACKING CASES, DEATHS AND LATEST RESTRICTIONS ][ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS & ANSWERS ABOUT THE COVID-19 VACCINE ] TUESDAY10:25 p.m. — The old K-Mart facility on State Avenue in Kansas City, Kansas has been turned into a COVID-19 vaccine distribution center. This will be one of three sites where people will be able to get their shots when it’s widely available. READ MORE.10 p.m. — The two biggest hospitals in Clay County, which include a lot of Kansas City north of the river, did not receive the COVID-19 vaccine until this week. That’s much later than some of the metro’s other big facilities. READ MORE.3 p.m. — St. Louis-area hospitals continue to be stretched thin while battling the coronavirus pandemic, local health officials announced Tuesday. Bed capacity at hospitals in the St. Louis area is at about 82%, according to the St. Louis Metropolitan Pandemic Task Force. Intensive care units are at 90% capacity. Cases continue to rise in the St. Louis area, and at least another 16 St. Louis County police officers tested positive for the virus in the past week. According to the department, there have been at least 145 confirmed cases at the agency so far this year. Statewide, 17,778 new confirmed cases have been reported in the past week, according to state health department data. That’s about 2,540 new cases a day on average. State health officials on Tuesday urged Missourians, including healthy people, to get tested for the virus. The agency asked those without symptoms to consider getting tested to help stop the virus’ spread through asymptomatic carriers and to prevent unknowingly sickening friends and loved ones over the holidays. The University of Missouri-Columbia on Tuesday also announced most students living on campus must be tested for the virus before moving back after the winter break. Students who recently tested positive won’t need to be retested.2:30 p.m. — Missouri Gov. Mike Parson said Tuesday afternoon that more than 23,000 vaccines have been administered to frontline health care workers and nursing home residents and staff according to Phase 1A of Missouri’s Vaccination Plan. Parson said there are over 450,000 Missourians included in Phase 1A, which will take several weeks to complete. State and local governments and health care partners are administering vaccines to those recipients as efficiently as possible. Currently, 285 facilities across the state are approved to administer the COVID-19 vaccine to Phase 1A eligible recipients within their facility. More than 700 additional facilities are expected to be approved within the coming days and weeks. Vaccinators have been approved in all geographic regions of Missouri, and Parson said “more will continue to be brought onboard to ensure vaccines are distributed equitably and efficiently.””The announcement of a second vaccine that is proven to be safe and effective in preventing COVID-19 is great news for the people of Missouri. The approval of an additional vaccine will help us move through the phases of our vaccination plan and offer more vaccines to Missourians, ” Parson said. “While we continue to receive positive news in our fight against COVID-19, I remind Missourians that the virus is still here, and we all must take the necessary precautions to prevent the spread of this virus, especially through the holiday season.”12:30 p.m. — After initially being left off the COVID-19 vaccine distribution list, the Kansas City Veterans Affairs Medical Center received its initial shipment of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine Tuesday morning.11:45 a.m. – Dr. William Pankey, Vibrant Health Medical Director, becomes the organization’s first COVID-19 vaccine recipient.11 a.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services reported 2,123 new confirmed cases on Tuesday, bringing the state’s total to 370,439 since the pandemic began.There have now been 5,158 deaths linked to COVID-19 in Missouri, which is up 205 from Monday’s reporting. The MSHSS said Monday night that 140 new deaths were discovered after an analysis of death certificates and those numbers were reflected in Tuesday’s totals.[ MISSOURI COVID-19 DASHBOARD]Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.The state said it has tested a total of 3,496,171, and 111,858 were tested in the past seven days. There have been 17,778 positive cases and an average of 2,540 cases a day in the last week.Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 28,400 (+394) confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 21,519 (+357) cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 5,837 (+118) cases in Clay County, 5,008 (+130) in Cass County and 2,128 (+55) in Platte County.9 a.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services said late Monday night that it has discovered an additional 140 COVID-19 associated deaths that will be reflected in the state’s disease surveillance system on Tuesday.“This weekly activity has been occurring for several months and typically causes a sharp increase in the deaths added to Missouri’s total the following day,” the MDHSS said in a news release. “As a reminder, not all deaths reported each day occurred in the previous 24 hours. Once DHSS reports a death we have been made aware of, the death is assigned on the date that the death occurred, not when it was reported.” 7 a.m. — The state of Kansas isn’t officially listing the number of people who have recovered from COVID-19, but local health departments across the state are keeping track. According to numbers from Tuesday morning, there have been 137,708 people who have recovered from the coronavirus. This includes 23,012 in Johnson County, 9,409 in Wyandotte County, 4,117 in Leavenworth County, 4,385 in Douglas County and 1,049 in Miami County.[ COVID-19 IN KC: TRACKING CASES, DEATHS AND LATEST RESTRICTIONS ][ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS & ANSWERS ABOUT THE COVID-19 VACCINE ] MONDAY6:05 p.m. — A Kansas City, Missouri, man is speaking about his participation in a clinical trial for the new Moderna COVID-19 vaccine. “It’s an incredible sign of hope,” said Ben Snider, who volunteered for the trial after seeing a friend post about the opportunity on social media earlier this year. Last week, the Food and Drug Administration gave approval to distribute the Moderna vaccine inside the United States, and Snider spent the week awaiting good news. READ MORE.5:10 p.m. — Lawrence-Douglas County Public Health said it received its allotment of the Moderna vaccine doses Monday from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment. The doses will be used to vaccinate public health staff and EMS first responders in Douglas County. Health officials said they expect to begin the EMS vaccinations within the next week.3:45 p.m. — Kansas will need far more doses of coronavirus vaccines than it’s set to receive in the coming days to start giving shots to all residents 75 or older, officials at a major health care system said Monday, as the state reported its worst seven-day spike in COVID-19 deaths of the pandemic. READ MORE2:30 p.m. — CVS Health plans to administer about 100,000 coronavirus vaccinations next week at Missouri long-term care facilities as the vaccination rollout expands beyond health care workers, the company said Monday. READ MORE12:30 p.m.– The Kansas Department of Health and Environment reported an increase of 4,174 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in its first update since Friday, pushing the statewide total to 204,600 since the outbreak started.KDHE officials said Monday the death total grew by 107 to 2,448 and hospitalizations increased by 92 to 6,267 since the outbreak started.Health officials said Monday that 39% (+7) of ICU beds are available and 76% (+0) of the state’s ventilators are available.The state said it has tested 946,123 people with 741,523 negative test results and an overall monthly positive test rate of 13.8%.[ KANSAS COVID-19 COVID-19 DASHBOARD ]Johnson County has moved back ahead of Sedgwick County for the highest confirmed cases since the start of the outbreak with 35,973. Sedgwick County is second with 35,723 cases. Wyandotte County is third with 14,297 cases. Leavenworth County has 4,761 cases, Douglas County reports 5,700 and Miami County has 1,566. Health officials said the median age of people with COVID-19 is 39, and they are monitoring 443 active outbreak clusters with 210 clusters reported in long-term care facilities.11:30 a.m. — After initially being left off the COVID-19 vaccine distribution list, the Kansas City Veterans Affairs Medical Center announced it will receive an initial shipment of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine as soon as Monday. READ MORE11 a.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services reported 3,130 new confirmed cases on Monday, bringing the state’s total to 368,316 since the pandemic began.There have now been 4,947 deaths linked to COVID-19 in Missouri, which is up 10 from Sunday’s reporting. The state lists 64 deaths in the past week with an average of nine per day.[ MISSOURI COVID-19 DASHBOARD]Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.The state said it has tested a total of 3,482,832, and 107,986 were tested in the past seven days. There have been 17,416 positive cases and an average of 2,488 cases a day in the last week.Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 28,006 (+257) confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 21,519 (+238) cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 5,719 (+75) cases in Clay County, 5,008 (+89) in Cass County and 2,128 (+35) in Platte County.9 a.m. — Health care workers at KC CARE Health Centers in Kansas City, Missouri, started receiving the first dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine on Friday. CEO Wil Franklin said the side effects he experienced were some soreness on his shoulder, mild fatigue and a wave of emotions. READ MORE7:30 a.m. — Kansas prison officials say a twelfth inmate with COVID-19 has died.The state Corrections Department said Saturday that a 62-year-old man who had been held at the Hutchinson Correctional Facility died Friday. He had been hospitalized with the virus since Nov. 23. Officials said he also had other health concerns that contributed to his condition.The inmate, who was not identified, had been serving a nearly 13-year sentence for aggravated indecent liberties with a child. He had been incarcerated since March 2013. Officials said this was the third COVID-19 related death at the Hutchinson prison. The Reno County Health Department reports 18 active cases of the virus at the prison, and 1,499 inmates have recovered from the virus.7 a.m. — The state of Kansas isn’t officially listing the number of people who have recovered from COVID-19, but local health departments across the state are keeping track. According to numbers from Monday morning, there have been 135,903 people who have recovered from the coronavirus. This includes 22,770 in Johnson County, 9,409 in Wyandotte County, 3,988 in Leavenworth County, 4,385 in Douglas County and 1,049 in Miami County.[ COVID-19 IN KC: TRACKING CASES, DEATHS AND LATEST RESTRICTIONS ][ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS & ANSWERS ABOUT THE COVID-19 VACCINE ] The Associated Press contributed to this story.

Kansas City metro area health officials are grappling with how to handle continuing case count increases after reopening businesses more than four months ago.

What you need to know:

  • The Kansas Department of Health and Environment said Monday the state has 209,689 confirmed cases of COVID-19, and there have been 2,507 deaths since the outbreak started. Kansas is now only updating COVID-19 data on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
  • The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services said Thursday there have been 376,811 cases of COVID-19 since the start of the outbreak and 5,294 deaths.

FRIDAY
7 a.m. — Two eastern Missouri restaurants have filed a lawsuit challenging an emergency order that closes bars and restaurants at 11 p.m. to stop the spread of the coronavirus.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Tony’s on Main in St. Charles and Shamrock’s Pub and Grill in St. Peters argued in court Wednesday that officials failed to act for months to stop the virus before issuing the “bizarre and non-sensical” emergency order on Nov. 24. The suit names St. Charles, St. Charles County and others.

St. Charles County Circuit Judge Ted House rejected the restaurants’ request for a temporary restraining order, saying they did not show enough evidence of “irreparable harm.” But he said they have a compelling case to recoup damages.

Dining restrictions started months ago across the region, with St. Louis city bars and restaurants subjected to a similar curfew. St. Louis County banned indoor service in mid-November but is considering whether to allow it to resume, with restrictions, in January.

St. Charles County Executive Steve Ehlmann said the bar curfew is intended to keep people “from flocking to St. Charles County after they are barred from other areas.”

But the suit argues that other St. Charles County businesses, such as diners, restaurants without liquor licenses and the Ameristar Casino, aren’t subjected to the curfew, and that there is no scientific basis for the order.

“We just want a level playing field,” said the restaurants’ attorney, Daniel Goldberg.

Statewide, 17,470 new confirmed coronavirus cases have been reported in the past week, according to state health department data. That’s an average of about 2,496 new cases a day.

Dr. Alex Garza, who leads the St. Louis Metropolitan Pandemic Task Force, said Wednesday that the numbers of coronavirus patients in the St. Louis region are dangerously high, and by all measures hospitals are facing an “extremely risky situation.”

The task force reported 871 COVID-19 patients in area hospitals, 182 in intensive care units, and 114 on ventilators. The hospitals also reported 31 patient deaths due to the virus, the highest number since the task force began tracking it in early October.

“The amount of virus spreading in our community is still putting us all at risk,” Garza said. “We are still at the height of the pandemic.”

6 a.m. — Kansas is working through the details of exactly who will be eligible for coronavirus vaccines in exactly what order as it concentrates on giving shots mostly to health care workers this month.

Democratic Gov. Laura Kelly told leaders of the Republican-controlled Legislature this week that the vaccines have gone mostly to health care workers, though that group also includes employees in state prisons. She said vaccines could go “almost exclusively” to health care workers into mid-January but also suggested some doses already have reached nursing homes.

Kelly told The Topeka Capital-Journal in an interview that prison inmates are to get vaccinated before the general public because they’re in “congregate” housing, but the state doesn’t expect vaccines to be available for some adults for at least several months.

The state’s vaccine plan made health care workers and nursing home workers and residents the the first in line, followed by other “essential” workers and people 75 or older, particularly those at high risk of coronavirus complications. But Kelly said in an Associated Press interview that the state is considering vaccinations for some officials to preserve “continuity of operations.”

“We expect that sometime right after the first of the year, we will have a more definitive list of who will be vaccinated when,” Kelly told legislative leaders during a meeting Wednesday.

Kansas has reported nearly 210,000 confirmed and probable coronavirus cases since the pandemic began in early March through Wednesday, or one for every 14 of its 2.9 million residents. It has reported more than 2,500 deaths, or one for every 1,162 residents.

Kelly’s staff has repeatedly said that she will get vaccinated — in public — when it’s “her turn.” However her husband, a retired pulmonologist and sleep disorder specialist, is working part-time in a clinic screening patients for COVID-19 and other diseases before surgeries and was vaccinated Tuesday.

And the governor said the state is looking at how quickly some key officials in state agencies, the courts and the Legislature should get vaccinated.

“We’re looking at that right now, determining who ought to be vaccinated soon,” Kelly told The Associated Press. “We’ll make that decision pretty quickly.”

The state prison system — housing about 8,600 inmates — has reported nearly 5,200 cases among offenders and another 944 cases among staff. Four workers and a dozen inmates have died.

The latest staff death was reported Wednesday by the El Dorado Correctional Facility. The prison about 30 miles (48 kilometers) northeast of Wichita described Gabe Morales as a “wonderful asset.”

Morales began his career in the state prison system at the Winfield Correctional Facility in May 2014 and moved to the El Dorado prison in July 2015. Part of Morales’s job was to prepare inmates for life after their sentences ended.

He told KAKE-TV for a story last year that, “It’s not about the person they are when they came in, you really want to affect them, so they’re a better person when they go out.”

Prison staff members who worked in units for inmates with COVID-19 began receiving vaccines last week.

The state’s vaccination plan calls for giving shots to “critical” populations after essential workers and at-risk older Kansans but does not specifically spell out whether prison inmates are in that group. Kelly said inmates will get shots when the state gives them to people in “congregate” living such as state hospitals.

That’s likely to spark some political backlash.

“There is no reason prisoners should ever get this vaccine before law abiding Kansans,” The Kansas Republican Party tweeted.

But Kelly told The Capital-Journal: “There are all sorts of other people who were not convicted of a crime who work in those facilities, and vaccinations protect them, too.”

Meanwhile, the state Department of Health and Environment reported that as of Wednesday, nursing homes had seen 530 clusters of two more cases, accounting for nearly 10,500 cases and almost 1,100 COVID-19 deaths — almost 44% of all the state’s coronavirus deaths. The department listed 51 active clusters of five or more cases in nursing homes, accounting for nearly 600 cases in all.

Vaccines for nursing home workers and residents are to be given on site, mostly through pharmacy giants CVS and Walgreens. Both have indicated that shots could start in Kansas next week.

Kelly has been “outspoken” in making sure frail, elderly Kansans are near the top of the list for the vaccine, said Linda MowBray, president and CEO of the Kansas Health Care Association, which represents about 260 long-term care facilities. But she said had hoped the vaccines would come sooner to the homes.

“When somebody says you’re tier one, priority one, right up there with everybody else, or the health care workers, it’s a little bit disheartening that it’s not really first of the first,” she said.

.


[ COVID-19 IN KC: TRACKING CASES, DEATHS AND LATEST RESTRICTIONS ]
[ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS & ANSWERS ABOUT THE COVID-19 VACCINE ]


THURSDAY
12:30 p.m.

There have now been 5,294 deaths linked to COVID-19 in Missouri, which is up 39 from Wednesday’s reporting.

There have been 76 deaths reported in the last seven days.

[ MISSOURI COVID-19 DASHBOARD]

Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.

The state said it has tested a total of 3,535,936, and 107,180 were tested in the past seven days. There have been 17,470 positive cases and an average of 2,496 cases a day in the last week.

Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 28,800 (+255) confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 22,368 (+252) cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 5,951 (+114) cases in Clay County, 5,259 (+65) in Cass County and 2,231 (+29) in Platte County.


[ COVID-19 IN KC: TRACKING CASES, DEATHS AND LATEST RESTRICTIONS ]
[ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS & ANSWERS ABOUT THE COVID-19 VACCINE ]


WEDNESDAY
8:30 p.m.

As of Wednesday, both states have yet to publish online statistics showing where the state has distributed COVID-19 vaccines, how many doses each state has received, and the demographics of people receiving shots. READ MORE.

1 p.m. — Missouri’s tradition-bound Senate is installing an audio monitoring system in its committee hearing rooms so employees, lobbyists and the public can listen to debate in their homes or offices as the pandemic rages.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Senate Administrator Patrick Baker said the changes could mean fewer people in a building that is often crowded during the nearly five-month annual session.

“It’s all because of COVID,” Baker said.

Statewide, 18,467 new confirmed cases have been reported in the past week, according to state health department data. That’s about 2,638 new cases a day on average.

As the pandemic progressed, a handful of lawmakers, Gov. Mike Parson, lobbyists and numerous staff members have been infected. Still masking is not widespread. During a recent meeting of the House, opposition to face coverings even in close quarters was evident, with an estimated 70 of the 163-member chamber going maskless.

Bringing Senate hearings to the internet is notable because the chamber has largely shunned technological innovation, with laptops barred from the chamber and votes cast verbally.

The House also is making changes in an attempt to give people an option of staying away from crowded corridors, with video links being installed in committee r

12:30 p.m. — The Kansas Department of Health and Environment reported an increase of 5,089 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in its first update since Monday, pushing the statewide total to 209,689 since the outbreak started.

KDHE officials said Wednesday the death total grew by 59 to 2,507 and hospitalizations increased by 157 to 6,424 since the outbreak started.

Health officials said Wednesday that 33% (-6) of ICU beds are available and 76% (+0) of the state’s ventilators are available.

The state said it has tested 962,204 people with 752,515 negative test results and an overall monthly positive test rate of 13.6%.

[ KANSAS COVID-19 COVID-19 DASHBOARD ]

Sedgwick County has moved back ahead of Johnson County for the highest confirmed cases since the start of the outbreak with 36,975. Johnson County is second with 36,727 cases. Wyandotte County is third with 14,857 cases. Leavenworth County has 4,823 cases, Douglas County reports 5,814 and Miami County has 1,618.

Health officials said the median age of people with COVID-19 is 39, and they are monitoring 429 active outbreak clusters with 215 clusters reported in long-term care facilities.

Noon — KMBC Investigates is working to find out how many people in Kansas and Missouri have received COVID-19 vaccines. Neither the Kansas Department of Health and Environment and the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services have vaccine dashboards yet.

This content is imported from Twitter.
You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

This content is imported from Twitter.
You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

This content is imported from Twitter.
You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

This content is imported from Twitter.
You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

This content is imported from Twitter.
You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

This content is imported from Twitter.
You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.


11 a.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services reported 3,141 new confirmed cases on Wednesday, bringing the state’s total to 373,580 since the pandemic began.

There have now been 5,255 deaths linked to COVID-19 in Missouri, which is up 67 from Tuesday’s reporting. The MSHSS said Wednesday morning that the spike can be attributed to analysis of death certificates and those numbers were reflected in the totals.

There have been 75 deaths reported in the last seven days.

[ MISSOURI COVID-19 DASHBOARD]

Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.

The state said it has tested a total of 3,513,613, and 116,530 were tested in the past seven days. There have been 18,467 positive cases and an average of 2,638 cases a day in the last week.

Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 28,545 (+145) confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 22,116 (+597) cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 5,837 (+31) cases in Clay County, 5,194 (+186) in Cass County and 2,202 (+74) in Platte County.

9:30 a.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services said this week’s death certificate analysis resulted in 246 COVID-19 case records being updated to reflect patient deaths. These 246 deaths were and will be reflected in Tuesday’s and Wednesday’s dashboard updates, the MDHSS said .

Below is a breakdown of when these 246 deaths occurred:

Month of Death

Count

Apr

1

Jul

2

Aug

1

Sep

1

Oct

7

Nov

153

Dec

81

Total updates

246

8 a.m. St. Louis-area hospitals continue to be stretched thin while battling the coronavirus pandemic, local health officials announced Tuesday.

Bed capacity at hospitals in the St. Louis area is at about 82%, according to the St. Louis Metropolitan Pandemic Task Force. Intensive care units are at 90% capacity.

Cases continue to rise in the St. Louis area, and at least another 16 St. Louis County police officers tested positive for the virus in the past week. According to the department, there have been at least 145 confirmed cases at the agency so far this year.

Statewide, 17,778 new confirmed cases have been reported in the past week, according to state health department data. That’s about 2,540 new cases a day on average.

State health officials on Tuesday urged Missourians, including healthy people, to get tested for the virus. The agency asked those without symptoms to consider getting tested to help stop the virus’ spread through asymptomatic carriers and to prevent unknowingly sickening friends and loved ones over the holidays.

The University of Missouri-Columbia on Tuesday also announced most students living on campus must be tested for the virus before moving back after the winter break. Students who recently tested positive won’t need to be retested.

7:30 a.m. — Gov. Laura Kelly on Tuesday named the Kansas Department of Labor’s deputy secretary as its top administrator as she works to find another, permanent leader for an agency that struggled for months to process a surge in claims from workers left unemployed by the coronavirus pandemic.

Acting Secretary Brett Flachsbarth became the third person to lead the Department of Labor in less than seven months. Kelly’s first labor secretary, Delia Garcia, resign in June amid problems with the system for distributing unemployment benefits. Her replacement, Acting Secretary Ryan Wright was allowed by law to serve only six months, which ended Tuesday.

The Democratic governor credited Wright with improving the Department of Labor’s operations and making “significant progress” in building a system to handle a program created by Congress to provide benefits under the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program to independent contractors and other workers who normally don’t receive benefits. But top Republican in the GOP-controlled Legislature said the department continues to struggle and he’s still getting complaints from constituents about their benefits being delayed.

“I don’t know that it improves anything or weakens anything,” incoming Senate Majority leader Gene Suellentrop, a Wichita Republican, said of Flachsbarth’s appointment.

Kelly said during a Statehouse news conference that she hopes to name a permanent secretary “in the next couple of weeks.” That appointment would require Kansas Senate confirmation, when an acting secretary’s appointment does not.

The changes at the Department of Labor come as the state continues to see hundreds of new confirmed and probable coronavirus cases day. Kansas has reported more than 204,000 cases since the pandemic reached the state in early March, or one for every 14 of its 2.9 million residents.

The state’s economy has weakened again recently, with a rise in new, initial claims for regular unemployment benefits in recent weeks. The state’s unemployment rate jumped to 5.6% in November from 5% in October, after dropping steadily from a 11.9% peak in April, when a statewide stay-at-home order issued by Kelly was in effect.

The Department of Labor acknowledged that it had a backlog of 25,000 regular unemployment claims in June, but spokesman Jerry Grasso said it was fewer than 3,000 as of Monday, down from almost 3,600 the week before. Kelly put the backlog Tuesday afternoon at about 1,800 claims.

For the extra Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program, Grasso said, 11,000 people with claims have submitted part or all of the documents they’d need to receive it. He said the state has another 14,000 to 15,000 “phantom” claims that either have been abandoned or are fraudulent. He said the department is handling about 500 issues related the PUA program a day.

The Department of Labor has said it has received more than 150,000 fraudulent claims for PUA benefits. Suellentrop, a business owner, said his name was used for one a month ago.

Kelly said the department “has largely been stabilized” under Wright. He is returning to his old job as Kelly’s deputy chief of staff.

“Are there problems still? Yes. Will there be problems tomorrow? Yes,” Kelly said. “But it’s how we approach problem-solving that’s most important, and we have approached it pretty aggressively, and, I think, been able to resolve most of the problems.”

Flachsbarth joined the labor department in 2005 and became deputy secretary in January 2019, when Kelly took office. The governor said he “knows the ins-and-outs of the issues” facing the agency.

Kelly and Department of Labor officials have blamed problems in processing claims for benefits on the agency decades-old computer system. Grasso said officials there have discussed upgrades costing about $30 million, with the cost possibly spread out over several years.

Suellentrop said: “We have to find a way to stand up another system as just absolutely as quick as possible. This is not going to go away.”

The pandemic also prompted Kelly to alter her plans for giving the governor’s annual State of the State address after the Legislature convenes its 90-day annual session Jan. 11. She plans to give a virtual address, rather than doing it in person in the House chamber at the Statehouse, with lawmakers, the Kansas Supreme Court and other officials packed into the hall.

7 a.m. — The state of Kansas isn’t officially listing the number of people who have recovered from COVID-19, but local health departments across the state are keeping track.

According to numbers from Wednesday morning, there have been 138,352 people who have recovered from the coronavirus.

This includes 23,205 in Johnson County, 9,409 in Wyandotte County, 4,117 in Leavenworth County, 4,385 in Douglas County and 1,049 in Miami County.


[ COVID-19 IN KC: TRACKING CASES, DEATHS AND LATEST RESTRICTIONS ]
[ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS & ANSWERS ABOUT THE COVID-19 VACCINE ]


TUESDAY
10:25 p.m.The old K-Mart facility on State Avenue in Kansas City, Kansas has been turned into a COVID-19 vaccine distribution center. This will be one of three sites where people will be able to get their shots when it’s widely available. READ MORE.

10 p.m.The two biggest hospitals in Clay County, which include a lot of Kansas City north of the river, did not receive the COVID-19 vaccine until this week. That’s much later than some of the metro’s other big facilities. READ MORE.

3 p.m. — St. Louis-area hospitals continue to be stretched thin while battling the coronavirus pandemic, local health officials announced Tuesday.

Bed capacity at hospitals in the St. Louis area is at about 82%, according to the St. Louis Metropolitan Pandemic Task Force. Intensive care units are at 90% capacity.

Cases continue to rise in the St. Louis area, and at least another 16 St. Louis County police officers tested positive for the virus in the past week. According to the department, there have been at least 145 confirmed cases at the agency so far this year.

Statewide, 17,778 new confirmed cases have been reported in the past week, according to state health department data. That’s about 2,540 new cases a day on average.

State health officials on Tuesday urged Missourians, including healthy people, to get tested for the virus. The agency asked those without symptoms to consider getting tested to help stop the virus’ spread through asymptomatic carriers and to prevent unknowingly sickening friends and loved ones over the holidays.

The University of Missouri-Columbia on Tuesday also announced most students living on campus must be tested for the virus before moving back after the winter break. Students who recently tested positive won’t need to be retested.

2:30 p.m. — Missouri Gov. Mike Parson said Tuesday afternoon that more than 23,000 vaccines have been administered to frontline health care workers and nursing home residents and staff according to Phase 1A of Missouri’s Vaccination Plan.

Parson said there are over 450,000 Missourians included in Phase 1A, which will take several weeks to complete. State and local governments and health care partners are administering vaccines to those recipients as efficiently as possible.

Currently, 285 facilities across the state are approved to administer the COVID-19 vaccine to Phase 1A eligible recipients within their facility. More than 700 additional facilities are expected to be approved within the coming days and weeks. Vaccinators have been approved in all geographic regions of Missouri, and Parson said “more will continue to be brought onboard to ensure vaccines are distributed equitably and efficiently.”

“The announcement of a second vaccine that is proven to be safe and effective in preventing COVID-19 is great news for the people of Missouri. The approval of an additional vaccine will help us move through the phases of our vaccination plan and offer more vaccines to Missourians, ” Parson said. “While we continue to receive positive news in our fight against COVID-19, I remind Missourians that the virus is still here, and we all must take the necessary precautions to prevent the spread of this virus, especially through the holiday season.”

12:30 p.m. — After initially being left off the COVID-19 vaccine distribution list, the Kansas City Veterans Affairs Medical Center received its initial shipment of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine Tuesday morning.

11:45 a.m. – Dr. William Pankey, Vibrant Health Medical Director, becomes the organization’s first COVID-19 vaccine recipient.

This content is imported from Twitter.
You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

11 a.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services reported 2,123 new confirmed cases on Tuesday, bringing the state’s total to 370,439 since the pandemic began.

There have now been 5,158 deaths linked to COVID-19 in Missouri, which is up 205 from Monday’s reporting. The MSHSS said Monday night that 140 new deaths were discovered after an analysis of death certificates and those numbers were reflected in Tuesday’s totals.

[ MISSOURI COVID-19 DASHBOARD]

Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.

The state said it has tested a total of 3,496,171, and 111,858 were tested in the past seven days. There have been 17,778 positive cases and an average of 2,540 cases a day in the last week.

Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 28,400 (+394) confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 21,519 (+357) cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 5,837 (+118) cases in Clay County, 5,008 (+130) in Cass County and 2,128 (+55) in Platte County.

9 a.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services said late Monday night that it has discovered an additional 140 COVID-19 associated deaths that will be reflected in the state’s disease surveillance system on Tuesday.

“This weekly activity has been occurring for several months and typically causes a sharp increase in the deaths added to Missouri’s total the following day,” the MDHSS said in a news release. “As a reminder, not all deaths reported each day occurred in the previous 24 hours. Once DHSS reports a death we have been made aware of, the death is assigned on the date that the death occurred, not when it was reported.”

7 a.m. — The state of Kansas isn’t officially listing the number of people who have recovered from COVID-19, but local health departments across the state are keeping track.

According to numbers from Tuesday morning, there have been 137,708 people who have recovered from the coronavirus.

This includes 23,012 in Johnson County, 9,409 in Wyandotte County, 4,117 in Leavenworth County, 4,385 in Douglas County and 1,049 in Miami County.


[ COVID-19 IN KC: TRACKING CASES, DEATHS AND LATEST RESTRICTIONS ]
[ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS & ANSWERS ABOUT THE COVID-19 VACCINE ]


MONDAY
6:05 p.m.A Kansas City, Missouri, man is speaking about his participation in a clinical trial for the new Moderna COVID-19 vaccine. “It’s an incredible sign of hope,” said Ben Snider, who volunteered for the trial after seeing a friend post about the opportunity on social media earlier this year. Last week, the Food and Drug Administration gave approval to distribute the Moderna vaccine inside the United States, and Snider spent the week awaiting good news. READ MORE.

5:10 p.m.Lawrence-Douglas County Public Health said it received its allotment of the Moderna vaccine doses Monday from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment. The doses will be used to vaccinate public health staff and EMS first responders in Douglas County. Health officials said they expect to begin the EMS vaccinations within the next week.

3:45 p.m. Kansas will need far more doses of coronavirus vaccines than it’s set to receive in the coming days to start giving shots to all residents 75 or older, officials at a major health care system said Monday, as the state reported its worst seven-day spike in COVID-19 deaths of the pandemic. READ MORE

2:30 p.m. — CVS Health plans to administer about 100,000 coronavirus vaccinations next week at Missouri long-term care facilities as the vaccination rollout expands beyond health care workers, the company said Monday. READ MORE

12:30 p.m.— The Kansas Department of Health and Environment reported an increase of 4,174 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in its first update since Friday, pushing the statewide total to 204,600 since the outbreak started.

KDHE officials said Monday the death total grew by 107 to 2,448 and hospitalizations increased by 92 to 6,267 since the outbreak started.

Health officials said Monday that 39% (+7) of ICU beds are available and 76% (+0) of the state’s ventilators are available.

The state said it has tested 946,123 people with 741,523 negative test results and an overall monthly positive test rate of 13.8%.

[ KANSAS COVID-19 COVID-19 DASHBOARD ]

Johnson County has moved back ahead of Sedgwick County for the highest confirmed cases since the start of the outbreak with 35,973. Sedgwick County is second with 35,723 cases. Wyandotte County is third with 14,297 cases. Leavenworth County has 4,761 cases, Douglas County reports 5,700 and Miami County has 1,566.

Health officials said the median age of people with COVID-19 is 39, and they are monitoring 443 active outbreak clusters with 210 clusters reported in long-term care facilities.

11:30 a.m. — After initially being left off the COVID-19 vaccine distribution list, the Kansas City Veterans Affairs Medical Center announced it will receive an initial shipment of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine as soon as Monday. READ MORE

11 a.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services reported 3,130 new confirmed cases on Monday, bringing the state’s total to 368,316 since the pandemic began.

There have now been 4,947 deaths linked to COVID-19 in Missouri, which is up 10 from Sunday’s reporting. The state lists 64 deaths in the past week with an average of nine per day.

[ MISSOURI COVID-19 DASHBOARD]

Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.

The state said it has tested a total of 3,482,832, and 107,986 were tested in the past seven days. There have been 17,416 positive cases and an average of 2,488 cases a day in the last week.

Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 28,006 (+257) confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 21,519 (+238) cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 5,719 (+75) cases in Clay County, 5,008 (+89) in Cass County and 2,128 (+35) in Platte County.

9 a.m. — Health care workers at KC CARE Health Centers in Kansas City, Missouri, started receiving the first dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine on Friday. CEO Wil Franklin said the side effects he experienced were some soreness on his shoulder, mild fatigue and a wave of emotions. READ MORE

7:30 a.m.Kansas prison officials say a twelfth inmate with COVID-19 has died.

The state Corrections Department said Saturday that a 62-year-old man who had been held at the Hutchinson Correctional Facility died Friday. He had been hospitalized with the virus since Nov. 23. Officials said he also had other health concerns that contributed to his condition.

The inmate, who was not identified, had been serving a nearly 13-year sentence for aggravated indecent liberties with a child. He had been incarcerated since March 2013.

Officials said this was the third COVID-19 related death at the Hutchinson prison. The Reno County Health Department reports 18 active cases of the virus at the prison, and 1,499 inmates have recovered from the virus.

7 a.m. — The state of Kansas isn’t officially listing the number of people who have recovered from COVID-19, but local health departments across the state are keeping track.

According to numbers from Monday morning, there have been 135,903 people who have recovered from the coronavirus.

This includes 22,770 in Johnson County, 9,409 in Wyandotte County, 3,988 in Leavenworth County, 4,385 in Douglas County and 1,049 in Miami County.


[ COVID-19 IN KC: TRACKING CASES, DEATHS AND LATEST RESTRICTIONS ]
[ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS & ANSWERS ABOUT THE COVID-19 VACCINE ]


The Associated Press contributed to this story.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *