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At current rate, Wisconsin says it will take a year for COVID-19 herd immunity – WISN Milwaukee

Wisconsin’s vaccine roll-out came under fire Thursday at the state Capitol in Madison.Continuing Coverage: Coronavirus in WisconsinLawmakers questioned state health officials, who now say it could take a year to reach herd immunity in Wisconsin.Gov. Tony Evers’ administration said it was moving as quickly as it can administering doses of the COVID-19 vaccine.But some Republican state representatives pressed health officials about what’s being done to speed up the process to make the vaccine available to everyone.The answers they got may not have been what they were hoping for.”The minute we get a vaccine from the federal government, it should be in and out the next day and in somebody’s arm,” Rep. Joe Sanfellipo (R-New Berlin) said.Those lawmakers said the slow roll-out was unacceptable and they want answers for their constituents.”A mother with four kids and they’re at home, and she just calls and says, ‘When can I expect to get the vaccine?’ And I can’t tell her,” Sanfellipo said.Assembly Health Committee members questioned why less than 50% of the state’s vaccines have been administered so far. “Why are we sitting on so many vaccines?” Rep. Chuck Wichgers (R-Muskego) asked.They also wanted to know why Wisconsin’s vaccination rate is below the national average.”We say we’re doing great with our partners. We’re not,” Wichgers said.As for getting the vaccine to the general public, Assistant Deputy Department of Health Services Lisa Olson said, “We’ve been estimating that the general public should be able to receive a vaccine in late spring-early summer. We’ve said June-ish. We know we are going to be continuing to do mass vaccinations all through the summer and likely into the fall.”That timeline was not what some on the committee were hoping to hear.”That’s just unacceptable,” Sanfellipo said. “We’ve known that these vaccines were coming and we’ve known that this process needs to be put in place for several months now.” The DHS did release a few new details about the vaccine distribution timeline.It hopes to start vaccinating people in Phase 1B by late this month or early next month.The goal remains to vaccinate 80% of the population to reach herd immunity.The DHS said that could take a year at the estimated rate of vaccinations.Officials said it all depends on vaccine availability and right now the state is only getting information about its supply on a week-to-week basis.As of Thursday, 195,152 vaccinations had been administered in Wisconsin.About 373,100 doses have been shipped to the state.Another 234,550 have been allocated by the federal government.President-elect Joe Biden has said he wants 100 million vaccinations to be administered in his first 100 days in office.Of the 30.6 million vaccines distributed to states, the CDC reported only about 11.1 million have been administered as of Thursday morning.Sign up for coronavirus email alerts from WISNGet breaking news alerts with the WISN 12 app.Follow us: Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

Wisconsin’s vaccine roll-out came under fire Thursday at the state Capitol in Madison.

Continuing Coverage: Coronavirus in Wisconsin

Lawmakers questioned state health officials, who now say it could take a year to reach herd immunity in Wisconsin.

Gov. Tony Evers’ administration said it was moving as quickly as it can administering doses of the COVID-19 vaccine.

But some Republican state representatives pressed health officials about what’s being done to speed up the process to make the vaccine available to everyone.

The answers they got may not have been what they were hoping for.

“The minute we get a vaccine from the federal government, it should be in and out the next day and in somebody’s arm,” Rep. Joe Sanfellipo (R-New Berlin) said.

Those lawmakers said the slow roll-out was unacceptable and they want answers for their constituents.

“A mother with four kids and they’re at home, and she just calls and says, ‘When can I expect to get the vaccine?’ And I can’t tell her,” Sanfellipo said.

Assembly Health Committee members questioned why less than 50% of the state’s vaccines have been administered so far.

“Why are we sitting on so many vaccines?” Rep. Chuck Wichgers (R-Muskego) asked.

They also wanted to know why Wisconsin’s vaccination rate is below the national average.

“We say we’re doing great with our partners. We’re not,” Wichgers said.

As for getting the vaccine to the general public, Assistant Deputy Department of Health Services Lisa Olson said, “We’ve been estimating that the general public should be able to receive a vaccine in late spring-early summer. We’ve said June-ish. We know we are going to be continuing to do mass vaccinations all through the summer and likely into the fall.”

That timeline was not what some on the committee were hoping to hear.

“That’s just unacceptable,” Sanfellipo said. “We’ve known that these vaccines were coming and we’ve known that this process needs to be put in place for several months now.”

The DHS did release a few new details about the vaccine distribution timeline.

It hopes to start vaccinating people in Phase 1B by late this month or early next month.

The goal remains to vaccinate 80% of the population to reach herd immunity.

The DHS said that could take a year at the estimated rate of vaccinations.

Officials said it all depends on vaccine availability and right now the state is only getting information about its supply on a week-to-week basis.

As of Thursday, 195,152 vaccinations had been administered in Wisconsin.

About 373,100 doses have been shipped to the state.

Another 234,550 have been allocated by the federal government.

President-elect Joe Biden has said he wants 100 million vaccinations to be administered in his first 100 days in office.

Of the 30.6 million vaccines distributed to states, the CDC reported only about 11.1 million have been administered as of Thursday morning.

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